Al Bainbridge

Remax Treeland Realty

Partners in Building Dreams

  • Office: 604-533-3491
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Al Bainbridge
Office:604-533-3491
RE/MAX Treeland Realty
#101, 6337 - 198 Street
Langley, BC
 
With interest rates still sitting near historically low levels – with nowhere to go but up – now is an ideal time for first-time homebuyers to embark upon homeownership.
 

But if low interest rates still don’t tip the scales on your decision to enter the property market, perhaps the information below will.

Down payment

The main reason many renters feel they can’t afford to purchase a home has to do with saving for a down payment. But there are many solutions available today that can help first-time buyers with their down payments.
 
Many lenders will allow for a gifted or borrowed down payment. And of those lenders that will not provide this alternative, many offer cash-back options that can be used as a down payment.
 
Better yet, there are programs available from some financial institutions where they will offer a “free down payment” or a “flex down”. Of course, you will end up paying about 1% more in your interest rate, but the program will help you get in the homeownership door and start accumulating equity earlier. The only catch, however, is that you must remain with the original lender for the full initial five-year term or else you’ll have to pay the down payment back.
 
Under the RRSP Home Buyers’ Plan, first-time homebuyers can withdraw up to $25,000 from their RRSPs for a down payment – tax- and interest-free.
 

And if there’s a couple making a home purchase together, they can each withdraw up to $25,000 from their RRSPs.

Making an informed decision

There’s an endless amount of information available to prospective homeowners – through the Internet, friends, family members and anyone willing to voice their opinion on a given subject. What you need, therefore, is education and coaching as opposed to being bombarded with more information.
 
That’s why it’s important to speak to me – a mortgage professional – in order to get a pre-approval prior to setting out home shopping. This will help set your mind at ease, because many first-time buyers are overwhelmed by the financing and buying processes, and often don’t know what it truly costs to purchase a home. I can provide you with real examples that can go a long way in showing you what it really costs to buy a home in your area versus what you’re currently paying in rent.
 
You may be pleasantly surprised by how manageable it is to start building equity in your own property as opposed to helping pay someone else’s mortgage each month!
 

As always, if you have any questions about down payment options or your mortgage in general, I’m here to help!

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First, buyers should understand the 1% rule. This rule postulates that normal maintenance on a home is about 1% of the value of the home per year. For example, a $250,000 home would require $2,500 per year to maintain. This would be enough to replace the roof covering...and then, a few years later, to replace a failed hot water tank...and then a few years more until a new central air system is required.
 
Then there is the 3% rule. Some experts say that home buyers should plan on spending 3% of the value of the home in the first year of ownership. This is because new homeowners will most likely have to buy drapes, blinds, a washer and dryer, a stove, maybe even a new roof covering. Also, new homeowners often customize the environment to their taste, so they need to budget for repairs, replacements and maintenance.
 
In addition, most home components have fairly predictable life cycles. For example, the typical life cycle of a high-efficiency furnace is 15 to 20 years. What this means is that most high-efficiency furnaces last between 15 and 20 years.
 

One way to know the extent of the maintenance needed and the costs to repair and/or replace items is to have a home inspection conducted. Home inspectors are required to let the buyer know if a component is significantly deficient or if it is near the end of its life cycle (service life), and a reputable home inspection company may offer up-to-date repair-cost guides to help clients with their planning.

Home inspectors work with Realtors and buyers to help them understand the issues that are found in the home, regardless of age, offering the right perspective and objective information. Home buyers need to understand that it's normal for items in a home to wear out. This should be regarded as normal "wear and tear" and not necessarily a defect.
 
A good home inspection determines the current condition of the house, offering a report of all the systems and components in need of maintenance, service, repair or replacement.
 
For example, consider a home inspection that uncovers that the heating system is old and requires replacement. A home buyer may see this as a huge problem. However, this problem may be the only item in the home that requires attention. If a buyer were to look at this situation in perspective, this home could be well above average-a home merely requiring a new furnace.
 
A good home inspection provides objective information to help the buyer make an informed decision. Knowing what items need to be budgeted for repair or replacement will help home buyers plan or negotiate better and not be stuck with unexpected costs of hundreds, or even thousands of dollars in the long run. Also, fixing these items will make a marked improvement on the performance of a home and minimize issues that could affect its future integrity...and value.
 
Provided courtest of:

Bjorn Rygg

Registered and Certified Home Inspector

Professional Home Inspections in Langley, White Rock and South Surrey

We know our stuff!

 

Bjorn.Rygg@pillartopost.com

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